portal
  Home About us Reports Charts News Custom Company Scan  
Report Charts News
*
Title Content
Economy&Goods
  Economy
  ConsumerGoods
  Food&Beverage
  Agriculture
Life Sciences
  Biotechnology
  Medical
  Pharmaceutical
Manufacturing
  Automotive
  Chemical
  Energy
  Machinery
  Material
  Metals & Minerals
Public Sector
  Environment
  Finance Service
  Infrastructure
  Logistics
  Real Estate
  Retailing
  Tourism
  Training
Technology And Media
  Electronics
  Internet
  Hardware
  Media
  Software
  Telecommunications

Tel: 0086-10-82600828
Fax: 0086-10-82601570
Email:


 Novel technique uses RNA interference to block inflammation
 
CreateTime:2011-10-10     Source:news.xinhuanet Editor:litingting
Text Size:       
 

WASHINGTON, Oct. 9 (Xinhua) -- U.S. researchers have found a way to block, in an animal model, the damaging inflammation that contributes to many disease conditions. In their report receiving early online publication Sunday in Nature Biotechnology, researchers describe using small interfering RNA technology to silence the biochemical signals that attract a particular group of inflammatory cells to areas of tissue damage.

"The white blood cells known as monocytes play a critical role in the early stages of the immune response," says Matthias Nahrendorf, of the Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) Center for Systems Biology, the paper's senior author. "We now know there are two subsets of monocytes -- an inflammatory subset that defends against pathogens and a reparative subset that supports healing. But if the inflammatory response is excessive, it can block the healing process and exacerbate conditions such as heart disease and cancer."

Cells damaged by injury or disease release a cocktail of chemicals called cytokines that attract immune cells to the site of the damage. Inflammatory monocytes are guided to sites of tissue injury by a receptor protein called CCR2, and the MGH-led team devised a strategy targeting that molecule to block the inflammatory process but not the action of the reparative monocytes.

Small interfering RNA (siRNA) technology prevents production of specific proteins by binding to associated messenger RNA molecules and preventing their translation. However, the technique requires extreme precision in developing the right siRNA molecule and delivering it to the correct cellular location.

To make sure that their siRNA preparation targeted the right monocytes, researchers first confirmed that its use reduced levels of CCR2 in monocytes and increased levels of the fragments produced when siRNA binds to its target. They then showed that monocytes from mice treated with the siRNA preparation were unable to migrate towards CCR2's usual molecular target. Experiments in animal models of several important diseases showed that the siRNA preparation reduced the amount of cardiac muscle damaged by a heart attack, reduced the size and the number of inflammatory cells in atherosclerotic plaques and in lymphomas, and improved the survival of transplanted pancreatic islets.

"These inflammatory monocytes are involved in almost every major disease," Nahrendorf explains. "Anti-inflammatory drugs currently on the market hit every inflammatory cell in the body, which can produce unwanted side effects. This new siRNA treatment doesn't affect inflammatory cells that don't rely on the CCR2 receptor. That makes a big difference."


Related Reports
China Blood Product Industry Report, 2020-2027
China Medical Robot Industry Report, 2020-2026
China In Vitro Diagnostic (IVD) Industry Report, 2019-2025
China Aged Care Industry Report, 2019-2025
China Dental Industry Report, 2019-2025
2005-2021 www.researchinchina.com All Rights Reserved 京ICP备05069564号-1